Current Studies & Projects

Emerald Ash Borer

"Like many of the Midwestern United States, Spring Grove Arboretum has succumbed to the infestation of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB). Spring Grove’s grounds contained over 450 Ash trees of various sizes, ages, and species. While over half of these trees have since been lost due to the EAB, action was taken to treat and prevent future loss on the Ash population. For the past five years, over 70 trees have been receiving Safari® chemical treatments to prevent infestation. These treatments were provided by Valent Professional Products. Spring Grove takes over this program in 2015.  In 2012, an additional 130 trees were added to this treatment list, using Xytect(R). Trees were selected based on location within the grounds, overall condition, age/maturity, and landscape value. Treatments will continue annually while the threat from Emerald Ash Borer remains high.  Unfortunately not all of the wonderful Ash trees can be saved, but Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum is striving to preserve as many of the various species as possible." 

If you have questions about the identification, management, or status of EAB issues within Ohio, please visit http://ohiodnr.com/?TabId=5205 for more information.

Callery Pear Structural Pruning Evaluation

Spring Grove Arboretum recently partnered with The Davey Institute, The Davey Tree Expert Company, and The Ohio State University for a multi-year study on the impact pruning young trees has on structural integrity. Callery Pear plantings were established on Spring Grove grounds in May of 2011. Six-foot ‘Redspire’ Callery pear trees were planted in rows spaced 15 feet apart; within each row, the trees were spaced 15 feet apart. During the second growing season, half of the trees will receive pruning treatments. Over the next 7 to 10 years these trees will be evaluated for growth, health, aesthetics, and structural stability. Spring Grove Arboretum is excited for the opportunity to serve as the study locale for this project which holds such valuable information for homeowners and industry professionals.

All American Selections

All American Selections (AAS) is an independent, non-profit organization that test grows new varieties of annual flowering herbaceous and vegetable plants then introduces only the best garden performers as AAS Winners.  Judges look for significantly improved qualities such as earliness to bloom or harvest, disease or pest tolerance, novel colors or flavors, novel flower forms, total yield, length of flowering or harvest and overall performance rating each entry on a 0 to 5 scale with 5 being the best.  An AAS Display Garden provides the public an opportunity to view the newest AAS winners in an attractive well-maintained setting.  A typical Display Garden is a public botanic garden or arboretum, a municipality, a garden retailer, a university garden and many others.  The network of nearly 200 dedicated AAS gardens includes 55 locations that have served for 25 years or longer. 

Mission Statement

"To promote new garden varieties with superior garden performance judged in impartial trials in North America."

 Purpose:

To test new, unsold cultivars of annual herbaceous flowering and vegetable plants, To inform gardeners about the AAS Winners, To earn gardeners' trust in the AAS Winners

 What is All-America Selections®?

All-America Selections is an independent, non-profit organization that tests new varieties then introduces only the best garden performers as AAS Winners.

Who determines an AAS Winner?

Independent AAS Judges determine the AAS Winners by judging and scoring the entries. The Judges score each entry from 0 to 5 points, with 5 being the highest. Judges report their scores after the growing season for that variety. Judges are located in geographically diverse areas all over the U.S. and Canada. AAS uses an independent accounting firm to calculate the average score of each entry. Only the entry with the highest average score is considered for a possible AAS Award. The AAS Judges determine which, if any, new, never-before-sold entries have proven superior qualities to be introduced as AAS Winners.

What qualities do the Judges score?

Judges look for significantly improved qualities such as earliness to bloom or harvest, disease or pest tolerance, novel colors or flavors, novel flower forms, total yield, length of flowering or harvest and overall performance. In the last ten years an entry needs to have at least two significantly improved qualities to be considered by Judges for an AAS Award.

 Why is an AAS Winner important to the home gardener?

The AAS Winners offer gardeners reliable new varieties that have proven their superior garden performance in Trial Grounds across North America, thus, our tagline of "Tested Nationally and Proven Locally®". When you purchase an AAS Winner, you know that it has been put through its paces by an independent, neutral trialing organization and has been judged by experts in their field. The AAS Winner label is like a stamp of approval.

 What is an AAS Display Garden?

An AAS Display Garden provides the public an opportunity to view the newest AAS winners in an attractive well-maintained setting. Additionally, Display Gardens can provide educational programs about the AAS trialing and award process during "open house" or "field day" events during their peak growing seasons. If they choose, Display Gardens can participate in a Landscape Design contest using AAS Winners.

A typical Display Garden is a public botanic garden or arboretum, a municipality, a garden retailer, a university garden and many others.

 The network of nearly 200 dedicated AAS gardens includes 55 locations that have served for 25 years or longer. The earliest AAS Display Garden, Norseco, Inc. of Quebec Canada became an AAS garden in 1962.


John Hauck Foundation Trees

On September 28, 2011, The Spring Grove Heritage Foundation received a grant from The John Hauck Foundation, Fifth Third Bank, John W. Hauck, E. Allen Elliot and Narley L. Haley, Co-Trustees in the amount of $15,000. The Spring Grove Heritage Foundation applied for the grant in order to assist Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum replace a significant number of trees lost to natural disasters and drought over the last five years. With the grant funds, Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum had the ability to replace the trees on a much more aggressive schedule that its current operating budget allowed.

These funds were used to purchase and install approximately 75 trees including selections of Elm, Ginkgo, Oak, Maple, Spruce, Sweetgum, Hornbeam, Paw Paw, Linden, Yellowwood, Kentucky Coffeetree, and London Planetree. These trees will play a vital role in reestablishing Spring Grove’s large tree population and serve as a source for enjoyment to be shared by all who visit the grounds.

Obituaries

George Grammas, 74
Born: Thursday, August 06, 1942
Died: Monday, September 26, 2016

Eugene Behrle, 99
Born: Sunday, February 18, 1917
Died: Saturday, September 24, 2016

La Devan "Devan" Johnson, 43
Born: Friday, February 02, 1973
Died: Saturday, September 24, 2016

Paula Dietz, 93
Born: Friday, October 20, 1922
Died: Friday, September 23, 2016

Arlene Falck, 52
Born: Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Died: Friday, September 23, 2016

Upcoming Events

Oct 01Weekend Walkabout / October
Oct 02CASS 5K
Oct 05October Public Tram Tour
Oct 0911th Annual 'Cruise In' Car Show
Oct 16Autumn Color Walking Tour
Oct 18Grief to Peace / Spring Grove
Oct 25Grief to Peace / Tri County
Oct 30Public Tram Tour October
Oct 30Public Tram Tour Oct
Nov 10 - Nov 10Planting for Diversity